Rani Durgavati – Birthday

Rani Durgavati was born in Banda, Uttar Pradesh to Shalivahan, the Chandela Rajput ruler of Mahoba, famed for his bravery and courage.

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Trained by Father Shalivahan

With her mother passing away early, Durgavati was bought up with great care by Raja Shalivahan, and was trained like a Rajput. Durgavati was trained by her father at a young age in horse riding, hunting and usage of weapons.

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Becoming a skilled archer

She soon became a skilled hunter, markswoman, who took pleasure in going on expeditions, also a skilled archer.

Dalpat Shah

Hearing about the valor of the Gond ruler Dalpat Shah, and his exploits against the Mughals, Durgavati was impressed by him.

When her guru pointed out that Dalpat Shah was a Gond, Durgavati replied “He might be a Gond by tribe, but his deeds make him a Kshatriya”

Dalpat Shah was one warrior, whom the Mughals feared, he controlled the territory that gave them passage to the South.

Marriage with Dalpat Shah

When Dalpat Shah bought up the alliance with Durgavati, many other Rajput rulers protested saying that he was a Gond.

The Rajput rulers knew very well that if Mughals were unable to advance to South, it was due to Dalpat Shah himself.

Shalivahan himself was not keen on Durgawati marrying Dalpat Shah, as he was not a Rajput. However considering the vow he gave to Durgavati’s mother, that he would allow her to choose her life partner, he agreed to Dalpat Shah.

Finally in 1524, Durgavati was married to Dalpat Shah, and this also bought the Gonds and Chandel dynasties in an alliance.

A new alliance against Mughals

The marriage between Durgavati and Dalpat Shah, in a way was strategically important too, bringing two dynasties together. With the Chandelas, Gonds coming together, a new alliance was formed against the Mughal rulers that could keep them in check.

Dalpat Shah dies

Sadly Dalpat Shah died soon, in 1550 and it was left to Durgavati to handle the kingdom. With her son, Bir Narayan, still a minor, Durgavati ruled as a regent.

Rule as a regent

Assisted by 2 ministers, Adhar Kayastha and Man Thakur, Durgavati reigned over the Gond kingdom with wisdom and success.

As a ruler, Rani Durgavati shifted her capital to Chauragarh, a strategically important fort on the Satpuras. Like her husband Dalpat Shah, Durgavati proved to be an able ruler, expanding the kingdom, looking after her subjects well.

Durgavati had a large army with 20,000 cavalry, 1000 war elephants, and large number of soldiers, which was well maintained.

Building reservoirs and tanks

Durgavati dug many reservoirs and tanks for the welfare of her people, one of the better known one is near Jabalpur called Ranital.

Defeating Baz Bahadur

When the Sultan of Malwa, Baz Bahadur, tried to attack Durgavati’s kingdom, she fought back and forced him to retreat. So heavy was the loss faced by Baz Bahadur at hands of Durgavati, that he dared not attack her kingdom again.

Akbar’s ambitions

In 1562, Akbar defeated Baz Bahadur, and took over Malwa, which now meant that Mughal Empire was touching Durgavati’s kingdom.

Lured by the prosperity of Gondwana, Akbar’s subedar Abdul Majid Khan, wanted to invade and occupy it along with Malwa.

Malwa had already fallen to Mughals, Rewa too was captured by Abdul Majid Khan, now only Gondwana was left.

Fighting the Mughal Army

Though her Diwan warned her against taking on the mighty Mughal Army, Rani Durgavati said she would prefer death to surrender.

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Initial Success

Rani Durgavati initially fought the Mughal Army at Narrai, flanked by the Narmada and Gaur rivers, and hilly ranges. Though the Mughal Army was superior to Durgavati’s, she led the defense, and fought back fiercely. Durgavati’s fierce counter assault on the Mughal Army chased them out of the valley and she was successful initially.

Facing Mughal Army in open combat

Buoyed by success, Durgavati wanted to attack the Mughal Army in night, but the suggestion was not accepted by her lieutenants. And this meant Durgavati had to face the Mughal Army in open combat, which would prove to be fatal to her.

Durgavati however refused to surrender, and with her son Vir Narayan, counter attacked the Mughal forces strongly. Riding on her elephant Sarman, Rani Durgavati, bravely counter attacked the larger and more superior Mughal army.

Durgavati’s son Vir Narayan, himself led a fierce attack on the Mughals, making them retreat thrice, before he was wounded badly. Hit by arrows and bleeding, Durgavati realized that defeat was imminent against the Mughals.

The End

Disregarding her mahout’s advice to flee from battle, Rani Durgavati, stabbed herself with a dagger, preferring death to surrender. Rani Durgavati, truly a remarkable lady, fiercely independent, wise ruler, some one who preferred not to surrender.

A Patron of Learning, An able administrator

Durgavati was also a patron of learning, respected scholars, encouraged building of temples, truly a great ruler. Apart from being just a brave warrior, she was able administrator, who built lakes, reservoirs for benefit of her subjects.

Her name lives on

Rani Durgavati Birth.jpg

Rani Durgavati passed away physically, but her name lives on, especially in Jabalpur, where the university is named after her.

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Olympic Day

Olympics – Lighting the Flame

In modern Olympics, the first ceremony is lighting the Olympic flame. It starts with young women lighting the torch with the heat from the Sun. The flame is kept burning throughout the games.

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                                                            Young Women lighting the Olympic flame

This modern ceremony of lighting the Olympic flame evolved from the practices of ancient Olympics that were held in Greece, where the flame was revered and used as a mark to start the game. The modern practice of lighting the Olympic torch at Olympia, taking it to different parts of the world, and finally reaching it to the city where the games are to be played, culminating in the Olympic stadium, started at the games of 1928, at Amsterdam, Netherlands.

The flame ceremony has been respected across the world, during all times and in all traditions.

6 Vestal Virgins

Similar to the ceremony of the women lighting the flame in Greece, ancient Rome had the concept of the six vestal virgins guarding the flame.

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Vestal Virgins of Rome

Persia

Similarly, further to the east in ancient Persia, we have the concept of eternal flame, Azure. This was venerated and popularized by Zarathustra.

Azerbaijan

The modern day country of Azerbaijan, whose name comes from the word Azure, still has an eternal flame, burning to this day.

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The Eternal Flame at the Fire Temple in Azerbaijan

 India

Further to the east in India, for the last 5000 years and more, the concept of flame in the form of Agni has been venerated through the ages. Agni is one of the primary divinities in the pantheon of divinities in the Indian thought.

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                                                                            Agni in Indian thought

Since in practice, as found from archaeological excavations, Fire as Agni has been venerated in India, right through antiquity, in the mists of time, probably the concept of venerating Fire could be traced to Indian practice and knowledge system.

America

In America today, the main symbol of freedom is the statue of liberty. The figure in the statue carries a flame in her hand, symbolizing a similar ethos across times, across traditions.

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Statue of Liberty holds the flame

  Thus we see that Celebration by fire initiation can be found all over the world.

International Yoga Day – D K Hari and Hema Hari

Bharath Gyan eBook : Yoga – the Union:

The root of the word Yoga and its practice, lies in India.

Yoga is not just exercise or postures.

Yoga, as the name suggests,is the practice by way of which mind, body and breath are aligned to achieve a state of harmony with each other and to become homogeneous with the cosmic consciousness – a state that brings with it a sense of freshness, energy and calm, a sense of balance of the various senses and emotions.

The extent of harmony and balance maintained, defines the depth of insight the Yogi has gained.

In a simplistic form, it is a structured combination of

Asana exercise postures for the body, which brings in physical health and shapes our personal attitude

Pranayama regulating energy through control of the breath and

Dhyana meditation for the mind, along with maintaining physiological, psychological and sociological hygiene through Yama (control / abstinence), Niyama (adherence) and other guidelines.

For more see our eBook : Yoga : The Union:

Summer Solstice

An important astronomic event happens every year in the month of June. This event is an important time marker in our lives.

Sun’s Movement

As we know, the earth is tilted on its axis by 23.4 degrees. Because of this tilt and the revolution of the earth around the sun, we perceive the sun to be moving northwards and southwards between the 2 latitudes, Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn, successively, in its annual six monthly journey each way.

Uttarayan & Dakshinayan

On June 21st of every year, our sun reaches the northern end of its journey at the Tropic of Cancer and transits into its journey southwards towards the tropic of Capricorn. The northern journey of the sun is known UttarayanUttar meaning north and the Southern Journey is called DakshinayanDakshin meaning southward.

Sun – Still

21st June is the day the sun reaches the northern most point of its journey and seems to be stationary on that day at the Tropic of Cancer. It is called the Summer Solstice. Sol meaning “Solar,” and Stice meaning “stationary”.

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For the people living in the northern hemisphere, this happens to be the longest day of the year.

Mid Summer Day

It is the mid summer day. A month before and after this day is peak summer in the northern hemisphere. This season in Indian languages is known as Greeshma Rthu, Greeshma meaning warm or hot. That is why we have the Hindi word ‘garam’ for hot.

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 Sun temples

In commemoration of this day, we have many sun temples in India. There is a plethora of Sun temples, almost in a straight line around 23 degrees North latitude along the tropic of Cancer, where the sun seems stationary for a few days.

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Stonehenge in England

Summer solstice has been celebrated at Stonehenge in England from Pagan days.

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Midsummer

In modern days, this day is observed as Midsummer all across Europe.  It is also called St John’s day. Bonfires are lit to celebrate the hottest period of the year.

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Shakespear Drama

William Shakespeare, the celebrated English playwright has written a drama called Mid Summer Night’s Dream, relating to this day.

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Other names in other parts

The day is similarly celebrated in other parts of the world under different names.

Festival Country
Tiregan Iran
Kapala Night Poland, Ukraine, Belarus, Russia
Wianki Poland
Juhannus Finland
Jani Latvia
Saint Jonas’ Festival Lithuania

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Tropic of Cancer

Tropic of Cancer has the sun directly overhead, on the day of Summer Solstice, which falls on 21st June. It is on this day that the Northern Hemisphere is tilted towards the sun to the maximum.

Tropic of Cancer, Capricorn and Equator – The 23.5 degree tilt

Tropic of Cancer is one among the three important latitudes, the other two being the Equator and the Tropic of Capricorn. It is also known as Northern Tropic, and is 23.5 degrees north of the equator. This line passes through India, in the states of Gujarat, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Chattisgarh and West Bengal, Tripura and Mizoram.

Tropic of Cancer passing through India

As the earth keeps going around the sun, there are certain points in the orbit, when due to the angle of the earth’s tilt, the days and nights either become equal (equinoxes) or day is longest in the Northern hemisphere (summer solstice) or night is longest in Northern Hemisphere (winter solstice). This occurs due to the tilt of the earth’s axis by 23 ½ degree.

Equinox and Solstice points on the Earth’s Orbit

Example – on Vernal Equinox, from Earth, Sun is seen against Aries

Seen from the earth, it gives us a perception that the sun is moving northwards and southwards every 6 months between the Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn which are latitudes at 23.5 degrees north and south of the equator, respectively.

The perceived, northern movement of the sun from Tropic of Capricorn to Tropic of Cancer is called as Uttarayanam in India. The other movement of the sun from Tropic of Cancer to Tropic of Capricorn is called Dakshinayanam or “Southern Journey”.

Currently the dates for the equinoxes and solstices are:

  • Spring or Vernal Equinox – March 20
  • Summer Solstice – June 21
  • Autumnal Equinox – Sept 22
  • Winter Solstice – Dec 21

Sol is Sun. Solar. Stice is stand still. So Solstice is the day the Sun is still over tropics. Hence movement of Sun happens the next day. Thus Dakshinayanam falls on June 22nd and Uttarayanam on December 22nd. More on this in our book, 2012-The Real Story.

Tropic of Cancer and the Ancient Prime Meridian at Ujjain

In ancient times, the line connecting the North Pole to South Pole, passing through Ujjain in India, was the Prime Meridian of the world then.

Today, the way, the Greenwich observatory is the marker point of the Greenwich meridian in London, in those days, the Maha Kaleshwara temple in Ujjain was the marker point.

Maha Kaleshwara temple

Maha means great, Kala means time and Eashwara means the controller. So this temple of Maha Kaleshwar in Ujjain represented the control mark for calculating and keeping track of time for the globe, in yester years.

The temple and the deity here seem to bear an apt name. What is further significant is, the reason why out of all the cities on this Meridian, Ujjain was chosen as the referral point.

It could have been because Ujjain is situated on the Tropic of Cancer.

The Indian name for this line is Karaka rekha.

D K Hari and D K Hema Hari at the Karka Rekha, Tropic of Cancer    

This line marks the northern limit of the annual traversal path of the sun between north and south of the equator.

Ujjain Meridian and Tropic of Cancer

More on the Tropic of Cancer and Ujjain Prime Meridian in our book and film, Understanding Shiva.

So why is the Tropic of Cancer called so?

This is because at the time of its naming, the sun was positioned in the Cancer constellation during the Summer Solstice in June.

Cancer is a constellation, which is the Latin word for a crab. Thus this zodiac is represented by a crab.

In the Greek legends, Cancer is identified with a Crab that attacked Hercules, who was fighting the multi headed Hydra. The crab bites Hercules on the foot, after which he crushes it. At that time the Greek Goddess Hera, an enemy of Hercules, places the crab among the stars.  

The most dreadful and fatal disease is also known as Cancer. This name Cancer for this disease had its origin when Hippocrates named the cancerous cells as Karkinos, meaning as crab. He named it after a crab perhaps because

  1. Malignant tumour is as hard as a rock, and reminded him of the hard shell of the coconut.
  2. The pain that the malignant tumour induces reminded him of the pain that a malignant tumour induces.

This word Karkinos became Cancer in Latin, which is the word for a crab in that language.

In the Samskrt language, the word for Tropic of Cancer is Karka Rekha, and this word Karka also means a crab. And again, the disease of Cancer in Samskrt and Ayurveda is referred to as Karka Roga.

This word Karka is etymologically similar to the Greek word Karkinos, and shows how the languages have travelled all across the world and mingled with each other.

Sun Temples

We have had Sun temples from Kashmir to Kanyakumari and from Afghanistan to Assam in the ancient Indian land of Bharatha, the most popular ones being Konark temple in Orissa, the Sun temple in Modhera and the Suryanarkovil in Kumbakonam among others which fall on the popular tourist circuits.

Sun Temple, Konark
Sun Temple, Modhera
Sun God Murti on wall of Natamandap, Konark temple complex from 13th century Orissa

The land of India today spans from 6.7 degrees North latitude to 37.1 degrees North latitude. In this wide span, we find a plethora of Sun temples, almost in a straight line around 23 degrees North latitude.

Save for a few such as Suryanarkovil near Kumbakonam in Tamil Nadu at 10.8 degrees North, the  Konark Sun Temple in Orissa at 19.9 degrees North etc. most of the other renowned temples can be found around 23 degrees North. Some are in ruins, some are memories and some are still in use today.

  • Suryanarayanaswamy temple at Arasavalli in Andhra Pradesh – 18.27 degrees
  • Sun Temple at Somnath Patan near Veraval in Gujarat – 20.9 degrees
  • Sun Temple at Madkheda near Tikamgadh, Madhya Pradesh – 22.9 degrees
  • Sun Temple at Umri near Tikamgadh, Madhya Pradesh – 22.9 degrees
  • Sun Temple at Kandaha, Bangaon, near Saharsa in Bihar – 23.0 degrees
  • Harsiddhi temple at Ujjain – Harsiddhi – 23.09 degrees
  • The famous Sun Temple at Modhera, near Ahmedabad, Gujarat –  23.5 degrees
  • Kanthad Nath at Kanthkot  near Rapar – 23.48 degrees
  • Sun Temple at Dholavira  – 23.89 degrees
  • 8th Century Sun Temple in Chittorgarh Fort, destroyed in 14th century and rebuilt as Kali temple  – 24.59 degrees
  • Surya mandir, Deo, Aurangabad, Bihar, 85 kms from Gaya – 24.5 degrees
  • Dakshinaarka Temple in Gaya – 24.7 degrees
  • Uttaraka temple near the Uttara Maanas tank in Gaya – 24.7 degrees
  • Gayaditya temple on the river Falgu in Gaya  – 24.7 degrees
  • Sun Temple at Jhaira Patan near Kota in Rajasthan: Ruins of an ancient temple – 25.1 degrees
  • The Dwadasha Aditya temples and more in Kashi also called Varanasi – 25.2 degrees
  • The Bhramanya Dev Temple at Unao in Madhya Pradesh, near Jhansi –  25.6 degrees
  • Sri Surya Pahar, Sun Temple at Goalpara in Assam  26.0
  • Sun Temple at Galta near Jaipur in Rajasthan – 26.5 degrees
  • Sun temple in Morar at Gwalior – 26.2 degrees
  • Sun Temple at Ranakpur near Udaipur in Rajasthan – 27.0 degrees
  • Sun Temple near Almora in Uttarakhand – 29.37 degrees
  • Sun Temple at Martand in Jammu and Kashmir 32.5 degrees

Not just these, the renowned sun temples of another Sun worshipping ancient civilization, namely Egypt, also has its sun temples at

  • Abu Simbel – 22.6 degrees
  • Karnak, Luxor – 25.43

Why do we find so many Sun temples almost in a straight row and that too around 23 degrees North latitude?

What did our ancestors know about the Sun that we do not, today?

What is the mystery behind this pattern?

23.5 degrees North latitude is the Tropic of Cancer.

As we have read in our school books, the Tropic of Cancer is the line up to which the sun moves North in its annual journey.

Sun at the Tropic Of Cancer on June 21

The way of living of our ancestors was in harmony with the Cosmos. They conducted their life, the annual and daily activities in their lives, in sync with the flow and rhythm of seasons, Rthu. Their Dharma, way of living,was governed by the Dharma, way of operating of the Cosmic Nature.

Hence they tracked the sun and other celestial bodies in the sky to read the skies and prepare themselves for the daily, annual and spiritual change that are bound to occur as our planet.

The way of living of our ancestors was in harmony with the Cosmos. They conducted their life, the annual and daily activities in their lives, in sync with the flow and rhythm of seasons, Rthu. Their Dharma, way of living, was governed by the Dharma, way of operating of the Cosmic Nature.

Hence they tracked the sun and other celestial bodies in the sky to read the skies and prepare themselves for the daily, annual and spiritual change that are bound to occur as our planet earth hurtles on its journey through space along with its parent, the Sun and its siblings , the other planets in the solar system.

Tropic of Cancer, Karka is one line where the Skies intermingle with the Earth!

Rani Lakshmibai

Rani Lakshmibai was born on 19th November, 1828 at Varanasi. She is popularly known in this land as Jhansi Ki Rani, meaning “Queen of Jhansi” as she ruled over the Maratha state Jhansi. She fought against British with the slogan Meri Jhansi Nahin Doongi. She was the rallying spirit behind the 1857 war of Independence against the British.

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Rani Lakshmibai

Birth

Rani Lakshmibai was born into a Maratha family. Her parents Moropant Tambe and Bhagirathi Sapre named her Manikarnika, after the Manikarnika Shakti Peeth in Varanasi.

Chhabili

Her father worked for the Peshwa, chief minister of Bithoor district. The Peshwa was very fond of her and nicknamed her Chhabili, meaning ‘playful’.

Education

She was educated in archery, horsemanship and self-defence at a very young age.

Marriage

In the year 1842, she was married to Raja Gangadhar Rao, the Maharaja of Jhansi. From then on she was called Lakshmibai and also Jhansi Ki Rani.

Son and Adopted Son

In 1851, Rani Lakshmibai gave birth to a son named Damodar Rao. The child was not to live long as he passed away within 4 months. Gangadhar Rao then adopted a child born to his cousin. This child was also named Damodar Rao.
Gangadhar Rao soon passed away in the year 1853, leaving alone his wife and adopted son. Rani Lakshmibai started ruling the kingdom.

British wanting to Annex Jhansi

British had by then annexed many of the Indian states and now wanted to seize Jhansi. Lord Dalhousie was the governor General of British India then. He sent notices to Rani Lakshmibai, rejecting her son Damodar Rao’s right to throne. They said that as Damodar Rao was not the biological son of Gangadhar Rao, he cannot lay claim to throne and that the state of Jhansi now belonged to the British. In this backdrop, Rani Lakshmibai was paid Rs 60,000 as pension and was ordered to vacate the palace at Jhansi fort.
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Meri Jhansi Nahi Dungi

Rani Lakshmibai was however not going to give up easily. She strengthened her defences and enlarged her Army recruiting many warriors of those times like Khuda Baksh, Gaulam Gaus Khan and Dost Khan among others into the army. Her famous slogan was “Meri Jhansi Nahi Dungi”, meaning, “I won’t give my Jhansi”.

First War of Independence

Three years later, in the year 1857, the first War of Independence broke out and there was unrest throughout the country. The attention of British was turned away from Jhansi to other parts of the country. Rani Lakshmibai seized this moment to further mobilize her forces.

The Battle

In the year 1858, after the First War of Independence, the British forces under Hugh Rose decided to lay siege on Jhansi. Rani Lakshmibai and her forces were by then fully prepared to take on the British.
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A fierce battle began between the Jhansi forces and British troops on 23rd May, 1858. Rani Lakshmibai led from the front and gave a tough time to the British, in a battle that lasted for two weeks. Her forces were also joined by the army of Tantya Tope.
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Her army was however not able to hold on against the British Troops who were more experienced in warfare and the British captured Jhansi fort.

Escape and Recoup

Rani Lakshmibai managed to escape from the city along with her few guards, by making a brave jump from the fort, on her horse.
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Rani Lakshmibai and her son Damodar Rao recouped their forces and joined with the other rebel group of Tantiya Tope.

Defeating Gwalior Maharaja

The combined forces of Rani Lakshmbai and Tantiya Tope now moved to Gwalior, where they defeated the Maharaja of Gwalior, who had joined hands with the enemy forces and captured the Gwalior fort.

Death

The British attacked Gwalior in a few days. Rani Lakshmibai passed away on 18th June, 1858, while saving the Gwalior fort.

Praise from the Enemy Camp

The remarkable bravery and courage she had shown all through, made even General Hugh Rose of the enemy camp remark, “Remarkable for her beauty, perseverance and intelligence, she was the most dangerous of all the rebel rulers”.

Legacy

After her death, she became a symbol of bravery and courage and was considered an icon by many freedom fighters who came after her, in the struggle for Independence. Many women were influenced by her life.

Portrait of Queen Laxmi Bai Made During Her Lifetime, Found In 1857 During Capture of Farrukhabad’s Palace Army

Army Female Unit named after her

The first female unit of the Indian Army was named after her.

Statues

Statues of Jhansi were erected in Jhansi and Gwalior, the two places of her glory.
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Post Independence, her statues were built in every nook and corner of the land as people still saw her as an epitome of bravery.
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Stamps

Stamps have been issued in her name by the Government of India.
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Films

Many films and serials have also been made on the life of Rani Lakshmibai.
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Part of school books

Today, every child knows her name as ‘Jhansi Ki Rani’, as her inspiring life has become part of textbooks in schools.
Rani Lakshmibai will remain an inspiration for the women and youth of this country for many more generations to come.

Battle of Haldighat

A fierce battle was fought between Rajput King Maha Rana Pratap and Mughal King Akbar on June 18th, 1576 CE, which has now come to be called the Battle of Haldighat.  Another record says that this battle was fought on 21st June. But these four days from 18th to 21st are commemorated in Haldighat and also at his birth place.

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Akbar’s Ploy

Akbar wanted to extend his Mughal Empire. The ploy he adopted was to take strong Hindu kings under him through friendship. These Hindu kings in turn helped him to defeat other Hindu kings.

Maha Rana Pratap

Maha Rana Pratap was persuaded by Akbar in every way, to come under him, but the Rajput King refused. Akbar soon lost his cool and declared a war on Rana Pratap. Rana Pratap also made preparations for the battle.

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 The battle

The two armies took stage at Haldighat. Akbar’s Army had 200000 soldiers while Rana Pratap had only 22,000.

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The list of notable warriors who took part in this battle include Rajputs, Baniyas, Brahmin, Bhil, Charans and more.

Portraits of the warriors of the Battle of Haldighat are displayed in Moti Magri Museum in Udaipur.

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Great Valour by Rana Pratap

The lesser numbers for Rana Pratap did not mean that the battle was a cake walk for Akbar. Rana Pratap and his soldiers fought with great valour.

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Chetak Horse

As much as this battle was fought by Rana Pratap’s brave warriors, it was also a story of great versatility shown by his horse, Chetak.

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Even though Rana Pratap was defeated, Akbar’s army could not completely conquer the Rajput king.

Sacrifice of Chetak

Rana Pratap’s horse made a great sacrifice in saving his master. Just as Alexander had a brave horse in Bucephalus, Rana Pratap had Chetak. Chetak was a native breed war horse, a Kathiawari.

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Chetak was seriously injured in the battle, but, to save his master’s life, it crossed over a big canal, to safety.

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As soon as it crossed, it fell down dead. Rana Pratap broke down and was moved by the great commitment his horse had shown in saving his life.

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A statue in memory

He created a beautiful garden at the spot where Chetak had passed away. A statue was later erected in its memory at Haldighat, where it had shown great bravery.

Scooter and Helicopter in its name

The valour of this horse is so ingrained in the Indian minds that the famous scooter in the 1980s and 1990s of India was named Chetak. Chetak is also an inspiration behind the name of India’s indigenously built helicopter. There is also an Express train in the name of Chetak.

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Many statues have been built over the centuries depicting Rana Pratap on his horse, Chetak.

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Popular across land

This battle of Haldighat goes down as one of the greatest battles fought by Maha Rana Pratap.

After this battle, the ethos and valour of Maha Rana Pratap reached far and wide through the country.

In Coin

His valour has been commemorated by the Government in a coin.

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A Serial

A serial on Maha Rana Pratap is being aired in TV, in English, Hindi and other vernacular languages. It is also popular in regions where Maha Rana Pratap has not visited. Such is the spread of his valour all over the land, across languages.

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